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The Gap In The Bridge League Of Nations Analysis Essay

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This cartoon implies that without America the bridge would collapse. The bridge represents the League of Nations, and Uncle Sam, the personification of America is reluctant to place the keystone in the bridge to complete it. This is odd because in the Treaty of Versailles, it was Woodrow Wilson the president of America that suggested that the League of Nations as part of his fourteen points. The missing keystone demonstrates how difficult it will be for the League to function without having the United States as a member. But it was a Republican majority in Congress that blocked the USA's entry into the League, not the President. It is now known that Wilson was very, very ill during vital periods at Versailles and afterwards and probably lacked the will to win Congress around.

Summary[edit]

DescriptionThe Gap in the Bridge.png

English: Caption:The Gap in the Bridge. Cartoon about the absence of the USA from the League of Nations, depicted as the missing keystone of the arch. The cigar also symbolizes America (Uncle sam) enjoying its wealth

Date(10 December 1919)
SourcePunch Magazine 10 December 1919 Raffo, P. (1974). The League of Nations. London: The Historical Association, p. 7
Authorartist: Leonard Raven-Hill
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File:The Gap in the Bridge.png

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This cartoon from the famous British magazine Punch illustrates the paradoxical situation in 1919 when it turned out that the United States (depicted as Uncle Sam), despite all the efforts made by President Thomas Woodrow Wilson (1856–1924), would not complete the building of the bridge, i.e. join the League of Nations – although the bridge had been "designed by the President of the USA", as the drawing suggests.


Leonard Raven-Hill (1867–1942), The Gap in the Bridge, cartoon, 1919, in: Punch Almanack 1919, p. 483; source: Wikimedia Commons, http://commons.wikimedia.org/wiki/File:The_Gap_in_the_Bridge.gif, public domain.

This cartoon from the famous British magazine Punch illustrates the paradoxical situation in 1919 when it turned out that the United States (depicted as Uncle Sam), despite all the efforts made by President Thomas Woodrow Wilson (1856–1924), would not complete the building of the bridge, i.e. join the League of Nations – although the bridge had been "designed by the President of the USA", as the drawing suggests.

Leonard Raven-Hill (1867–1942), The Gap in the Bridge, cartoon, 1919, in: Punch Almanack 1919, p. 483; source: Wikimedia Commons, http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/File:The_Gap_in_the_Bridge.gif, public domain.