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Salutations For Cover Letters When Closing Overapplied

Cover Letter Closing Examples

When you're writing a cover letter or sending an email message to apply for a job, it's important to close your letter in as professional a manner as possible. As with any job-related correspondence, it's best to opt for a more formal language and tone — a cover letter is no place for "XOXO," “Cheers,” or even a casual "take care" as a closer.

Cover Letter Closing Examples

The following is a list of letter closing examples that are appropriate for cover letters and other employment-related correspondence, such as thank you notes and/or emails to schedule interviews or pass along references.

  • Sincerely
  • Sincerely yours
  • Regards
  • Best
  • Best regards
  • With best regards
  • Kind regards
  • Yours truly
  • Most sincerely
  • Respectfully
  • Respectfully yours
  • Thank you
  • Thank you for your consideration

Closings Not to Use

A cover letter is a formal correspondence, so it's important not to be too casual or friendly when writing it. Here are some letter closings that are fine to use when emailing or writing to a friend, but are not appropriate to use in a cover letter. 

  • Affectionately
  • Best wishes
  • Cheers
  • Eagerly waiting for a response
  • Fondly
  • Warm regards
  • Warmest regards
  • Warmly
  • Take care
  • Take it easy
  • Have a great day
  • Have a nice day
  • Love
  • Smiles
  • XOXO
  • Yours
  • Yours faithfully
  • Abbreviations (Thx or any other abbreviated word isn't appropriate)
  • Any emoticon (no smiley faces)
  • Sent from my phone (if your phone automatically includes it, you can remove it in the settings)

How to Close the Letter

Follow the closing with a comma. Then, on a new line, put your name.

If you're sending an email, you can add your contact information below your name. For example:

Best regards,

Your Name
Your LinkedIn Profile URL
Your Email Address
Your Phone Number

Whichever sign-off you choose, make sure always to capitalize its first letter.

Set Up an Email Signature

To simplify, you can set up an email signature that includes your contact information.

An email signature will make it easy for correspondents to readily see how to get in touch and saves you the time of typing the information repeatedly.

In your signature, include your LinkedIn profile URL to make it easy for your recipients to view your skills, accomplishments, educational background, and work history. Depending on your field, you may also want to include a link to your Twitter account; if you do so, make sure that your account is professional and appropriate for viewing by potential employers. 

It’s a wise idea, when conducting a job search, to set up an email account (and accompanying address) dedicated solely to this search. Doing so will help to ensure that you don’t miss emails from potential employers who might be interested in interviewing you. It also will allow you to provide a professional-sounding email address on your resume and cover letter; this email address should be comprised simply of your name (Ex. “John_T._Smith” at gmail.com).

Too often, job candidates use their personal email accounts to apply for jobs, often using “cute” email names such as “Crafty_catlady@yahoo.com” or OrcWarrior100@gmail.com.” This casual practice often raises hiring managers, eyebrows, raising red flags about whether a candidate is a serious, qualified applicant for the job to which they are applying.

It’s better to err on the side of safety and separate your professional and personal email accounts.

Find out how to set up a professional email signature, including formatting style and links to help you save a signature in your preferred email program.

Cover letters, whether submitted through email or traditional mail channels, are always the first impression you provide a potential employer. Make sure that this impression is a good one by following the “best practices” outlined in these links so that your cover letter shines.

How to Write a Cover Letter
Having an appropriate close is just one of the many steps required to craft a winning cover letter. Review the links below to find out how to write a cover letter, including what to include in your cover letter, how to write a cover letter, typical cover letter formats, targeted cover letters, and cover letter samples and examples.

More About Cover Letters

Top 10 Cover Letter Writing Tips
Email Cover Letters
Sample Cover Letters

How to open and close your cover letter

On a cover letter, formality is rarely a bad thing.

Write your cover letter opening and closing with these tips.

In a tight job market flooded with resumes and cover letters, it’s a given that your documents and messages need to be error-free. So how else can you distinguish your communications? Appropriate openings and closings that convey professionalism and polish.

Use our tips below on how to start your cover letter with a proper greeting and sign off with a polished signature. And if you need additional writing tips, join Monster today, so the experts at Monster's Resume Writing Service can help you impress employers with a high-impact resume and cover letter.

Cover letter openings

Write a formal greeting, such as Dear Ms. Alvis or Dear Mr. Yang. If you're unsure of the person’s gender and can’t find out, write the full name, as in Dear Chu Li or Dear Chris Beltran.

While it is increasingly common to see greetings without the "Dear" in business, it is less formal. When applying for a job, sometimes you want to start off formally, even though you may take a less formal tone in subsequent written exchanges.

If you’re unfamiliar with someone’s name, be sure you don’t confuse the first name with the family name, which can easily happen in today’s global business environment, depending in part on the languages you know. For example, the CEO of Lenovo is Yang Yuanqing. His surname is Yang and his first name is Yuanqing (in Mandarin, the family name is written first), so if you are addressing him, you would write Dear Mr. Yang and not Dear Mr. Yuanqing.

A final comment on people’s names: be sure to spell them correctly. That is one typo no recipient will miss.

What if you cannot track down a contact name for your cover email? Use a generic salutation, such as Dear Hiring Manager, Dear Recruiting Manager or Dear Human Resources Professional. (Avoid To Whom It May Concern; it is antiquated.) Another option is to write Greetings, which is somewhat informal but polite. You could also dispense with the opening greeting altogether and start with your first sentence, although some recipients might find that approach to be abrupt.

In all openings, be sure to capitalize the first letter of every noun and follow your greeting with punctuation. Use either a colon (Dear Mr. Yang:) or a comma (Dear Recruiting Manager,).

Cover letter closings

End your message with a formal closing, such as Sincerely, Regards or Best regards. If your closing contains more than one word, capitalize only the first word, as in Best regards or Sincerely yours. And be sure to put a comma after your closing. A common error in business communications is the omission of that comma.

Your full name goes on the next line. No need for the extra space that used to go on letters for the signature. Write your telephone number and email address on separate lines after your name. Although this contact information is on your resume (and your email address is on your email), including it with your cover message makes life easier for the recipient.

 

This post is by Helen Cunningham and Brenda Greene, authors of The Business Style Handbook, An A-to-Z Guide for Effective Writing on the Job