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Sternberg 1986 Critical Thinking

Recommended Resources for Teachers 

 

Books

Sternberg, R. J. (1986). Intelligence applied: Understanding and increasing your intellectual skills. San Diego, CA: Harcourt Brace Jovanovich.

Sternberg, R. J., & Spear-Swerling, L. (1996). Teaching for thinking. Washington, DC: American Psychological Association.

Sternberg, R. J., & Williams, W. M. (1996). How to develop student creativity. Alexandria, VA: Association for Supervision and Curriculum Development.

Williams, W. M., Blythe, T., White, N., Li, J., Sternberg, R. J., & Gardner, H. I. (1996). Practical intelligence for school: A handbook for teachers of grades 5–8. New York: HarperCollins.

Sternberg, R. J., & Grigorenko, E. L. (2000). Teaching for successful intelligence. Arlington Heights, IL: Skylight Training and Publishing Inc.

Williams, W. M., Markle, F., Brigockas, M., & Sternberg, R. J. (2001). Creative intelligence for school (CIFS): 21 lessons to enhance creativity in middle and high school students.Needham Heights, MA: Allyn & Bacon.

Sternberg, R. J., & Williams, W. M. (2001). Educational psychology. Boston, MA: Allyn & Bacon.

Sternberg, R. J., & Grigorenko, E. L. (2007).  Teaching for successful intelligence (2nd ed.).  Thousand Oaks, CA: Corwin Press.

Sternberg, R. J., Kaufman, J. C., & Grigorenko, E. L. (2008).  Applied intelligence. New York: Cambridge University Press.

Sternberg, R. J., Jarvin, L., & Grigorenko, E. L. (2009). Teaching for wisdom, intelligence, creativity, and success. Thousand Oaks, CA: Corwin.

Sternberg, R. J., & Williams, W. M. (2010). Educational psychology (2nd ed.). Upper Saddle River, NJ: Pearson/Merrill.

Book Chapters 

Sternberg, R. J. (1999). Schools should nurture wisdom. In B. Z. Presseisen (Ed.), Teaching for intelligence I (pp. 55–82). Arlington Heights, IL: Skylight Training and Publishing Inc.

Sternberg, R. J. (2000). Creativity is a decision. In A. L. Costa (Ed.), Teaching for intelligence II (pp. 85–106). Arlington Heights, IL: Skylight Training and Publishing Inc.

Sternberg, R. J., & Williams, W. M. (2001). Teaching for creativity: Two dozen tips. In R. D. Small, & A. P. Thomas (Eds.), Plain talk about education (pp. 153–165). Covington, LA: Center for Development and Learning.

Reznitskaya, A., & Sternberg, R. J. (2004). Teaching students to make wise judgments: The “teaching for wisdom” program. In P. A. Linley, & S. Joseph (Eds.) Positive psychology in practice, (pp. 181-196). New York: Wiley.

Sternberg, R. J. (2004). Teaching for wisdom: What matters is not what students know, but how they use it. In D. R. Walling (Ed.) Public Education, Democracy, and the Common Good (pp. 121–132). Bloomington, IN: Phi Delta Kappan.

Sternberg, R. J., Jarvin, L., & Reznitskaya, A. (2008). Teaching of wisdom through history: Infusing wise thinking skills in the school curriculum. In M. Ferrari & G. Potworowski (Eds.), Teaching for wisdom (pp. 37-57). New York: Springer.

Sternberg, R. J. (2010). Teaching for creativity. In R. A. Beghetto & J. C. Kaufman (Eds.), Nurturing creativity in the classroom (pp. 394-414). New York: Cambridge University Press.

  

Articles

      Sternberg, R. J. (1981). Intelligence as thinking and learning skills. Educational Leadership, 39, 18–20.

Sternberg, R. J. (1984). How can we teach intelligence? Educational Leadership, 42, 38–50.

Sternberg, R. J. (1984). Testing intelligence without IQ tests. Phi Delta Kappan, 65, 694–698.

Sternberg, R. J. (1985). Teaching critical thinking, Part 1: Are we making critical mistakes? Phi Delta Kappan, 67, 194–198.

Sternberg, R. J. (1985). Teaching critical thinking, Part 2: Possible solutions. Phi Delta Kappan, 67, 277–280.

Sternberg, R. J., & Baron, J. B. (1985). A statewide approach to measuring critical thinking skills. Educational Leadership, 43, 40–43.

Sternberg, R. J., & Bhana, K. (1986). Synthesis of research on the effectiveness of intellectual skills programs: Snake-oil remedies or miracle cures? Educational Leadership, 44(2), 60–67.

Spear, L. C., & Sternberg, R. J. (1987). Teaching styles: Staff development for teaching thinking. Journal of Staff Development, 8(3), 35–39.

Sternberg, R. J. (1987). Teaching critical thinking: Eight easy ways to fail before you begin. Phi Delta Kappan, 68, 456–459.

Sternberg, R. J. (1990). Thinking styles: Keys to understanding student performance. Phi Delta Kappan, 71, 366–371.

Sternberg, R. J., Okagaki, L., & Jackson, A. (1990). Practical intelligence for success in school. Educational Leadership, 48, 35–39.

Sternberg, R. J., & Lubart, T. I. (1991). Creating creative minds. Phi Delta Kappan, 72 (8), 608–614.

Sternberg, R. J. (1994). Allowing for thinking styles. Educational Leadership, 52(3), 36–40.

Sternberg, R. J. (1994). Answering questions and questioning answers. Phi Delta Kappan, 76 (2), 136–138.

Sternberg. R. J. (1995). Investing in creativity: Many happy returns. Educational Leadership, 53(4), 80–84.

Sternberg, R. J. (1997). What does it mean to be smart? Educational Leadership, 54(6), 20–24.

Spear-Swerling, L., & Sternberg, R. J. (1998). Curing our “epidemic” of learning disabilities. Phi Delta Kappan, 79, 397–401.

Sternberg, R. J., Torff, B., & Grigorenko, E. L. (1998). Teaching for successful intelligence raises school achievement. Phi Delta Kappan, 79, 667–669.

Sternberg, R. J., & Grigorenko, E. L. (2001). Learning disabilities, schooling, and society. Phi Delta Kappan, 83(4), 335–338.

Sternberg, R. J., Grigorenko, E. L., & Jarvin, L. (2001). Improving reading instruction: The triarchic model. Educational Leadership, 58(6), 48–52.

Sternberg, R. J. (2002). It’s not just what you know, but how you use it: Teaching for wisdom in our schools. Education Week, 22(11), 42, 53.

Sternberg, R. J. (2002). It’s not what you know, but how you use it: Teaching for wisdom. The Chronicle of Higher Education, 48(42), B20.

Sternberg, R. J. (2002). Raising the achievement of all students: Teaching for successful intelligence. Educational Psychology Review, 14, 383–393.

Sternberg, R. J. (2003). Teaching for successful intelligence: Principles, practices, and outcomes. Educational and Child Psychology, 20(2), 6–18.

Sternberg, R. J., & Grigorenko, E. L. (2003). Teaching for successful intelligence: Principles, procedures, and practices. Journal for the Education of the Gifted, Vol. 27, No. 2, 207–228.

Sternberg, R. J. (2004). WICS: A model of educational leadership. The Educational Forum, 68(2), 108–114.

Sternberg, R. J. (2005). A model of educational leadership: Wisdom, intelligence, and creativity synthesized. International Journal of Leadership in Education: Theory & Practice, 8, 347-364.

Sternberg, R. J. (2006). Recognizing neglected strengths.  Educational Leadership, 64 (1), 30–35.

Sternberg, R. J., Reznitskaya, A. & Jarvin, L. (2007). Teaching for wisdom: What matters is not just what students know, but how they use it. The London Review of Education, 5 (2), 143-158. 

Sternberg, R. J. (2008).  Assessing what matters.  Educational Leadership, 65 (4), 20-26.

Sternberg, R. J. (2008).  Excellence for all.  Educational Leadership, 66 (2), 14-19.

Sternberg, R. J. (2008).  Schools should nurture wisdom.  In B. Z. Presseisen (Ed.), Teaching for intelligence (2nd ed., pp. 61-88). Thousand Oaks, CA: Corwin.

Sternberg, R. J. (2010). Teaching for ethical reasoning in liberal education. Liberal Education, 96(3), 32-37.

Sternberg, R. J. (2013).  Reform education: Teach wisdom and ethics. Phi Delta Kappan, 94(7), 45-47.

This paper refers to studies and research concerning teachers’ knowledge and beliefs. From the 1980s researchers have examined several aspects of teachers’ thought processes [1], [2], [3]. Teachers’ beliefs are considered in order to understand how teachers conceptualize their work, how they make decisions and how they choose their practices. Some definitions and the nature of teachers’ beliefs are about teaching, learning and intelligence. A growing body of research argues that teachers’ beliefs should be examined in context, considering the influence of culture [4], [5]. In spite of all the social factors which might influence teachers’ beliefs, many authors ask themselves if teachers’ beliefs can be changed and how. There are some models of conceptual change and alternative models of belief change [6], [7]. I am currently investigating these arguments as a PhD student. I planned a research project considering the implications for teachers’ education and ways to improve that. My research questions are: What is the relationship between teachers’ beliefs about intelligence and learning, and the use of critical thinking activities in the classroom? Is it a relationship influenced by the teachers’ self-efficacy? I prepared a questionnaire for primary teachers using validated instruments: the critical thinking beliefs appraisal [8]; the teacher beliefs survey [9]; the learning inventory [10]; the teachers’ sense of efficacy scale [11] and the implicit theories of intelligence scale [12]. I have started handing out the questionnaire and I am proceeding with data analysis.